Outreach

  • Human settlement causes changes in the plant biodiversity of islands around the world 11 times more intense than the climate

    Iceland was colonized about 1,000 years ago by Vikings, a navigating people who turned the economy upside down. Newcomers also left a mark on the natural environment that would never be erased again, as did many other people who have colonized islands around the world.

    Iceland was colonized about 1,000 years ago by Vikings

    In Iceland from the year 920 the activity of the first settlers accelerated changes in vegetation, intensified erosion and destroyed forests in favor of pastures. Image: Pûblic domain.

    The raw materials and resources offered by the remote island in the Arctic Ocean aroused a strong interest in the newcomers, who would forever influence the economy of the area, northern Europe and almost the whole world.  But the Vikings left an imprint on Iceland’s natural environment that would never be erased again, like many of the other peoples who colonised islands around the world.

    In Iceland, although the rate of change in an ecosystem’s plant-life is linked to the climate prior to the arrival of humans, from the year 920 onwards the activity of the first settlers accelerated changes in the plant biodiversity, intensified erosion and destroyed forests in favour of pastures. The wood needed to build boats, the stone and metal of an island so rich in resources were plundered for years.

    Today, most inhabited islands around the world have undergone at least two different waves of settlement, each with its own characteristic changes and increasingly complex legacy. This is due to the irreversible nature of the changes that have occurred, which are becoming faster and faster.

    Human settlement causes changes in the plant biodiversity of islands around the world 11 times more intense than the climate

    Santo Antão Island, Cape Verde (North Atlantic), where European settlers first landed 370 years ago. Cape Verde is considered the first tropical European colony in the Atlantic. Image: Sandra Nogué.

    The article ‘The human dimension of biodiversity changes on islands’ published at the end of April 2021   in the journal Science indicates that changes in the plant life of an island ecosystem caused by human colonisation are 11 times greater than those due to climate or effects such as predicted volcanic eruptions. The research has been carried out on 27 islands around the world.

    The research was conducted on 27 islands around the world

    The research was carried out on 27 islands around the world, with geographical locations and climates as diverse as those of the South Pacific Ocean, the Indian Ocean, the South Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean, among others. Image: Sandra Nogué.

    This modification caused by human action is irreversible and is constantly reproducing itself, centuries after colonisation by humans. The first author of the article is the researcher Sandra Nogué, from the Southampton University (United Kingdom), who analysed the data and shaped the work while she was a visiting researcher at CREAF, when she collaborated with researcher Josep Peñuelas. The study involves an international team of professionals from all over the world, including Manuel Steinbauer, who co-led the paper, researcher at the University of Bayreuth (Germany) and at the University of Bergen (Norway).

    The islands, an ideal laboratoryIt is one of the first times that human impact on a landscape is quantified. It has been made possible by analyzing fossilized pollen from 5,000 years ago extracted from sediments.

    The study is one of the first times it has been possible to quantify the human impact on a landscape, as until now it has been difficult to separate the effects of climate and other environmental impacts on continental masses from those caused by early humans. The research team has studied fossilised pollen from 5,000 years ago, extracted from sediments from the 27 islands, which has allowed them to understand the composition of the vegetation on each island and how it changed from the oldest pollen samples to the most recent ones.

    “The islands are ideal laboratories for measuring human impact,” says Sandra Nogué, “as most of them were colonised in the last 3,000 years, when the climates were similar to today. Knowing when an isolated territory was colonised facilitates the scientific study of the changes in the composition of its ecosystem in earlier and later years, and provides an idea of its magnitude”.

    For this reason it has been key to know that the population of the Polynesian islands arrived 3,000 years ago to remote islands such as Poor Knight (New Zealand, South Pacific Ocean) and also to Fiji (South Pacific); that in 2,800 years ago they arrived in New Caledonia (Pacific), and 370 years ago Europeans landed at Cabo Verde (North Atlantic), considered the first tropical European colony in the Atlantic. And, for example, on some islands in the archipelago of the Canary Islands (Atlantic Ocean), the European population arrived between 1,800 and 2,000 years ago, while on the Mauritius Islands (Indian Ocean), European settlers arrived only 302 years ago.

    Laurisilva vegetation in La Gomera, Canary Islands

    In some islands of the Canary Islands (Atlantic) the European population arrived between 1,800 and 2,000 years ago. This has made it possible to maintain the ‘laurisilva’ vegetation. Image: Sandra Nogué.

    “Those that were colonised by more modern populations, such as the Galapagos Islands (Equator, Pacific Ocean, first inhabited in the 16th century) or the New Zealand Poor Knight, had a greater impact on their environment,” exposes Nogué. “On the other hand, the occupied areas were previously inhabited by more primitive populations, who developed a life more closely linked to the natural rhythm and more sustainable and, therefore, the territory was more resilient to human setllement“. For example, the study shows that the islands where humans arrived more than 1,500 years ago, such as Fiji and New Caledonia, experienced a slower rate of change.

    “This difference in change could mean that the previously populated islands were more resistant to the arrival of humans. But it is more likely that the land-use practices, technology and species introduced by the later settlers were more transformative than those of the earlier ones,” explains the lead researcher of the study.

    Josep Peñuelas

    “This scientific study can help guide restoration efforts and understand the territory’s ability to respond to change”.

    JOSEP PEÑUELAS, researcher at CREAF.

    Although it is not possible to expect the ecosystems to recover the situation before the settlements, the work can help to “guide restoration efforts and to understand the capacity of the territory to respond to change”, in the words of Josep Peñuelas.

    From Fiji to Cabo VerdeThe research team has found that human disturbances outweigh natural phenomena and the changes they cause are often irreversible.

    The trends were observed in geographic locations and climates as diverse as those of the South Pacific Ocean, the Indian Ocean, the South Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean, among others. Changes in ecosystems can also be due to various natural factors, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, extreme weather conditions and changes in sea level. However, the research team has found that the disturbances caused by humans outweigh all these phenomena and the change is often irreversible. For this reason, they recommend that conservation strategies take into account the long-term impact of humans and the extent to which current ecological changes differ from those of pre-human times.

    The results show little evidence that the ecosystems affected by humans resemble the dynamics present before their arrival. Therefore, anthropogenic impacts on islands are long-lasting components of these systems that usually involve an initial cleansing (for example, through the use of fire), and are compounded by the introduction of a range of species and the extinction of endemic ones, in addition to ongoing disturbance.

    Source: http://blog.creaf.cat/en/noticias/human-settlement-changes-plant-biodiversity-islands-11-times-more-intense-climate-science/

    La colonización humana provoca cambios en la vegetación de islas de todo el mundo 11 veces más intensos que el clima

    Islandia fue colonizada hace unos 1.000 años por vikingos, un pueblo navegante y negociante que le dio la vuelta la economía. Pero los recién llegados también dejaron una huella en el entorno natural que nunca más se borraría, al igual que muchos otros pueblos establecidos en islas de todo el mundo.

    La colonización humana provoca cambios en la vegetación de islas de todo el mundo 11 veces más intensos que el clima

    En Islandia a partir del año 920 la actividad de los primeros pobladores aceleró cambios en la vegetación, intensificó la erosión y destruyó bosques a favor de los pastos. Imagen: Dominio público.

    Las materias primas y los recursos que ofrecía la remota isla del Océano Ártico despertaron un fuerte interés de los recién llegados, que dieron la vuelta para siempre a la economía de la zona, del norte de Europa y de casi todo el mundo. Pero los vikingos dejaron una huella en el entorno natural de Islandia que nunca más se borraría, al igual que muchos otros pueblos que han colonizado islas en todo el mundo.

    En Islandia, si bien la vegetación muestra cambios en el clima previos a la llegada humana, a partir del año 920 la actividad de los primeros pobladores aceleró cambios en la vegetación, intensificó la erosión y destruyó bosques a favor de los pastos. La madera necesaria para construir embarcaciones, la piedra y el metal de una isla tan rica en recursos fueron saqueados durante años.

    Actualmente, la mayoría de islas habitadas de todo el mundo han experimentado al menos dos oleadas de asentamientos diferentes, cada una con cambios característicos y con legados cada vez más complejos. Esto se debe a la condición irreversible de los cambios que se han producido, que cada vez son más rápidos.

    La colonización humana provoca cambios en la vegetación de islas de todo el mundo 11 veces más intensos que el clima

    Isla de Santo Antão, Cabo Verde (Atlántico Norte), donde colonizadores europeos desembarcaron por primera vez hace 370 años. Cabo Verde se considera la primera colonia europea tropical del Atlántico. Imagen: Sandra Nogué.

    El artículo ‘The human dimension of biodiversity changes on islands’ publicado a final de abril 2021 en la revista Science indica que los cambios en la vida vegetal del ecosistema de una isla producidos por la colonización humana son 11 veces mayor que los debidos al clima o a efectos como erupciones volcánicas previos. La investigación se ha llevado a cabo en 27 islas de todo el mundo.

    La investigación se ha llevado a cabo en 27 islas de todo el mundo

    La investigación se ha llevado a cabo en 27 islas de todo el mundo, de ubicaciones geográficas y climas tan diversos como los del Océano Pacífico Sur, el Índico, el Atlántico Sur o el Océano Ártico, entre otros. Imagen: Sandra Nogué.

    Esta modificación causada por la acción humana es irreversible y se reproduciendo de manera constante, siglos después de la colonización por parte del hombre. La primera autora del artículo es  es la investigadora Sandra Nogué, de la Universidad de Southampton (Reino Unido), que analizó los datos y dio forma al trabajo mientras era investigadora visitante en el CREAF, período en que colaboró ​​con el investigador Josep Peñuelas. En el estudio interviene un equipo internacional con profesionales de todo el mundo, entre los que destaca Manuel Steinbauer, co-autor del artículo e investigador de la Universidad de Bayreuth (Alemania) y de la Universidad de Bergen (Noruega).

    Las islas, un laboratorio idealEs una de las primeras veces que se cuantifica el impacto humano en un paisaje. Se ha podido hacer analizando polen fosilizado de hace 5.000 años extraído de sedimentos.

    El estudio constituye una de las primeras veces que se puede cuantificar el impacto humano en un paisaje, ya que hasta ahora en las masas continentales era difícil separar los efectos del clima y otros impactos ambientales de los provocados por los primeros humanos. El equipo de investigación ha estudiado polen fosilizado de hace 5.000 años, extraído de sedimentos de las 27 islas, que ha permitido entender la composición de la vegetación de cada una y cómo cambió desde las muestras de polen más antiguas hasta a las más recientes.

    “Las islas son laboratorios ideales para medir el impacto humano”, apunta Sandra Nogué, “ya que la mayoría fueron colonizadas los últimos 3.000 años, cuando los climas eran similares a los actuales. Saber cuándo se colonizó un territorio aislado facilita estudiar científicamente los cambios de la composición de su ecosistema en años anteriores y posteriores, y aporta una dimensión de su magnitud”.

    Por eso ha sido clave conocer que la población de las islas de la Polinesia llegó hace 3.000 años a zonas remotas como Poor Knight (Nueva Zelanda, Océano Pacífico Sur) y también a Fiji (Pacífico Sur); que hace 2.800 que llegaron a Nueva Caledonia (Pacífico), y 370 años que los europeos desembarcaron en Cabo Verde (Atlántico Norte), considerada la primera colonia europea tropical del Atlántico. Y, por ejemplo, a algunas islas del archipiélago de las Canarias (Atlántico) la población europea llegó hace entre 1.800 y 2.000 años, mientras que en las Islas Mauricio (Océano Índico) sólo hace 302 años que pusieron un pie colonizadores europeos.

    Vegetación de laurisilva en La Gomera, Canarias

    A algunas islas del archipiélago de las Canarias (Atlántico) la población europea llegó hace entre 1.800 y 2.000 años. Esto ha permitido mantener la vegetación de la laurisilva. Imagen: Sandra Nogué.

    “El medio ambiente de las que fueron colonizadas por poblaciones más modernas, como las Galápagos (Ecuador, Océano Pacífico, habitadas por primera vez en el siglo XVI) o la neozelandesa Poor Knight, recibieron más impacto”, explica Nogué. “En cambio, las ocupadas previamente recibieron poblaciones más primitivas, que desarrollaron una vida más ligada al ritmo natural y más sostenible y, por tanto, el territorio fue más resiliente a la colonización”. Por ejemplo, el estudio evidencia que las islas a las que llegaron los humanos hace más de 1.500 años, como Fiji y Nueva Caledonia, experimentaron un ritmo de cambio más lento.

    “Esta diferencia en el cambio podría significar que las islas pobladas antes fueron más resistentes a la llegada de los humanos. Pero es más probable que las prácticas de uso de la tierra, la tecnología y las especies introducidas por los últimos pobladores fueran más transformadoras que las de los primeros”, explica la investigadora principal del trabajo.

    Josep Peñuelas

    “Este estudio científico puede ayudar orientar los esfuerzos de restauración y entender la capacidad de respuesta del territorio al cambio”.

    JOSEP PEÑUELAS, investigador del CREAF.

    Si bien no se puede esperar que los ecosistemas recuperen la situación anterior a los asentamientos, el trabajo puede ayudar a “orientar los esfuerzos de restauración y entender la capacidad de respuesta del territorio al cambio”, en palabras de Josep Peñuelas.

    De las Fidji a Cabo VerdeEl equipo de investigación ha comprobado que las perturbaciones causadas por los humanos superan los fenómenos naturales, y que los cambios que provocan suelen ser irreversibles.

    Las tendencias se observaron en ubicaciones geográficas y climas tan diversos como los del Océano Pacífico Sur, el Índico, el Atlántico Sur o el Océano Ártico, entre otros. Los cambios en los ecosistemas también pueden ser debidos a varios factores naturales, tales como terremotos, erupciones volcánicas, condiciones meteorológicas extremas y cambios en el nivel de mar. Sin embargo, el equipo de investigación ha comprobado que las perturbaciones causadas por el hombre superan todos estos fenómenos y el cambio suele ser irreversible. Por ello, aconsejan que las estrategias de conservación tengan en cuenta el impacto a largo plazo de los humanos y el grado en que los cambios ecológicos actuales difieren de los de la época pre humana.

    Los resultados muestran pocos indicios de que los ecosistemas afectados por el hombre se parezcan a las dinámicas presentes antes de su llegada. Por lo tanto, los impactos antropogénicos en las islas son componentes duraderos de estos sistemas que suelen implicar una limpieza inicial (por ejemplo, mediante el uso de fuego), y se ven agravados por la introducción de una serie de especies y la extinción de endémicas, además de perturbaciones continuas.

    Fuente: Blog Creaf

    La colonització humana provoca canvis en la vegetació d’illes d’arreu del món 11 vegades més intensos que el clima

    Islàndia va ser colonitzada fa uns 1.000 anys per víkings, un poble navegant i negociant que li va capgirar l’economia. Però els nouvinguts també van deixar una empremta en l’entorn natural que mai més s’esborraria, igual com molts d’altres pobles que establerts a illes d’arreu del món.

    Islàndia va ser colonitzada fa uns 1.000 anys per víkings

    A Islàndia a partir de l’any 920 l’activitat dels primers pobladors va accelerar canvis en la vegetació, va intensificar l’erosió i va destruir boscos a favor de les pastures. Imatge: Domini públic.

    Les matèries primeres i els recursos que oferia la remota illa de l’Oceà Àrtic van despertar un fort interès dels nouvinguts, que van capgirar per sempre més l’economia de la zona, del nord d’Europa i de gairebé tot el món. Però els víkings van deixar una empremta en l’entorn natural d’Islàndia que mai més s’esborraria, igual com molts d’altres pobles que han colonitzat illes arreu del món.

    A Islàndia, si bé la vegetació mostra canvis vinculats al clima previs a l’arribada dels humans, a partir de l’any 920 l’activitat dels primers pobladors va accelerar canvis en la vegetació, va intensificar l’erosió i va destruir boscos a favor de les pastures. La fusta necessària per construir embarcacions, la pedra i el metall d’una illa tan rica en recursos van ser saquejats durant anys.

    Actualment, la majoria d’illes habitades de tot el món han experimentat almenys dues onades d’assentament diferents, cadascuna amb canvis característics i obtenint com a herència llegats cada vegada més complexos. Això és degut a la condició irreversible dels canvis que s’han produït, que cada vegada són més ràpids.

    La colonització humana provoca canvis en la vegetació d’illes d’arreu del món 11 vegades més intensos que el clima

    Illa de Santo Antão, Cabo Verde (Atlàntic Nord), on colonitzadors europeus van desembarcar per primera vegada fa 370 anys. Cabo Verde es considera la primera colònia europea tropical de l’Atlàntic. Imatge: Sandra Nogué.

    L’article ‘The human dimension of biodiversity changes on islands’ publicat avui a la revista Science indica que els canvis en la vida vegetal de l’ecosistema d’una illa produïts per la colonització humana són 11 vegades més gran que els deguts al clima o a efectes com ara erupcions volcàniques previs. La investigació s’ha dut a terme a 27 illes d’arreu del món.

    La investigació s'ha dut a terme a 27 illes d'arreu del món

    La investigació s’ha dut a terme a 27 illes d’arreu del món, d’ubicacions geogràfiques i climes tant diversos com els de l’Oceà Pacífic Sud, l’Índic, l’Atlàntic Sud o l’Oceà Àrtic, entre d’altres. Imatge: Sandra Nogué.

    Aquesta modificació causada per l’acció humana és irreversible i es va reproduint de manera constant, segles després de la colonització per part de l’home. La primera autora de l’article és la investigadora Sandra Nogué, de la Universitat de Southampton (Regne Unit), que va analitzar les dades i donar forma al treball mentre era investigadora visitant al CREAF, període en què va col·laborar amb l’investigador Josep Peñuelas. A l’estudi hi intervé un equip internacional amb professionals d’arreu del món, entre els que també té un paper rellevant Manuel Steinbauer, co-autor de l’article i investigador de la Universitat de Bayreuth (Alemanya) i de la Universitat de Bergen (Noruega).

    Les illes, un laboratori idealÉs una de les primeres vegades que es quantifica l’impacte humà en un paisatge. S’ha pogut fer analitzant pol·len fossilitzat de fa 5.000 anys extret de sediments.

    L’estudi constitueix una de les primeres vegades que es pot quantificar l’impacte humà en un paisatge, ja que fins ara a les masses continentals era difícil separar els efectes del clima i d’altres impactes ambientals dels provocats pels primers humans. L’equip de recerca ha estudiat pol·len fossilitzat de fa 5.000 anys, extret de sediments de les 27 illes, que ha permès entendre la composició de la vegetació de cadascuna i com va canviar des de les mostres de pol·len més antigues fins a les més recents.

    “Les illes són laboratoris ideals per mesurar l’impacte humà”, apunta Sandra Nogué, “ja que la majoria van ser colonitzades els últims 3.000 anys, quan els climes eren similars als actuals. Saber quan es va colonitzar un territori aïllat facilita l’estudi científic dels canvis de la composició del seu ecosistema en anys anteriors i posteriors, i aporta una dimensió de la seva magnitud”.

    Per això ha sigut clau conèixer que la població de les illes de la Polinèsia va arribar fa 3.000 anys a illes remotes com ara Poor Knight (Nova Zelanda, Oceà Pacífic Sud) i també a les Fidji (Pacífic Sud); que en fa 2.800 que van arribar a Nova Caledònia (Pacífic), i 370 anys que els europeus van desembarcar a Cabo Verde (Atlàntic Nord), considerada la primera colònia europea tropical de l’Atlàntic. I, per exemple, a algunes illes de l’arxipèlag de les Canàries (Atlàntic) la població europea hi va arribar fa entre 1.800 i 2.000 anys, mentre que a les Illes Maurici (Oceà Índic) només fa 302 anys que hi van posar un peu colonitzadors europeus.

    Vegetació de laurisilva a La Gomera, Canàries

    A algunes illes de l’arxipèlag de les Canàries (Atlàntic) la població europea hi va arribar fa entre 1.800 i 2.000 anys. Això ha permès mantenir la vegetació de la laurisilva. Imatge: Sandra Nogué.

    “Les que van ser colonitzades per poblacions més modernes, com ara les Galápagos (Equador, Oceà Pacífic, habitades per primera vegada al segle XVI) o la neozelandesa Poor Knight, van rebre més impacte en el seu medi ambient”, explica Nogué. “En canvi, les ocupades prèviament van rebre poblacions més primitives, que hi van desenvolupar una vida més lligada al ritme natural i més sostenible i, per tant, el territori va ser més resilient a la colonització”. Per exemple, l’estudi evidencia que les illes a les que van arribar els humans fa més de 1.500 anys, com Fiji i Nova Caledònia, van experimentar un ritme de canvi més lent.

    “Aquesta diferència en el canvi podria significar que les illes poblades abans van ser més resistents a l’arribada dels humans. Però és més probable que les pràctiques d’ús de la terra, la tecnologia i les espècies introduïdes pels últims pobladors fossin més transformadores que les dels primers”, explica la investigadora principal del treball.

    Josep Peñuelas

    “Aquest estudi científic pot ajudar orientar els esforços de restauració i a entendre la capacitat de resposta del territori al canvi”.

    JOSEP PEÑUELAS, investigador del CREAF.

    Si bé no es pot esperar que els ecosistemes recuperin la situació anterior als assentaments, el treball pot ajudar a “orientar els esforços de restauració i a entendre la capacitat de resposta del territori al canvi”, en paraules de Josep Peñuelas.

    De les Fidji a Cabo VerdeL’equip d’investigació ha comprovat que les pertorbacions causades pels humans superen els fenòmens naturals i els canvis que provoquen solen ser irreversibles.

    Les tendències es van observar en ubicacions geogràfiques i climes tant diversos com els  propis de l’Oceà Pacífic Sud, l’Índic, l’Atlàntic Sud o l’Oceà Àrtic, entre d’altres. Els canvis en els ecosistemes també poden ser deguts a diversos factors naturals, com ara terratrèmols, erupcions volcàniques, condicions meteorològiques extremes i canvis en el nivell del mar. Malgrat tot, l’equip d’investigació ha comprovat que les pertorbacions causades per l’home superen tots aquests fenòmens i el canvi sol ser irreversible. Per això, aconsellen que les estratègies de conservació tinguin en compte l’impacte a llarg termini dels humans i el grau en què els canvis ecològics actuals difereixen dels de l’època pre humana.

    Els resultats mostren pocs indicis que els ecosistemes afectats per l’home s’assemblin a les dinàmiques presents abans de la seva arribada. Per tant, els impactes antropogènics a les illes són components duradors d’aquests sistemes que solen implicar una neteja inicial (per exemple, mitjançant l’ús de foc), i es veuen agreujats per la introducció d’una sèrie d’espècies i l’extinció de endèmiques, a més de pertorbacions contínues.

    Font: Blog CREAF

    The Reuters Hot List

    The Global Ecology Unit Director Prof Josep Peñuelas and one of our senior members Prof Marc Estiarte have been included in the Reuters list of the world’s top climate scientists. Prof Peñuelas tops the list of the Spanish researchers whiles Prof Estiarte holds eighth position.

    The Reuters Hot List created a system of identifying and ranking 1,000 climate academics according to how influential they are. To identify the 1,000 most influential scientists, we created the Hot List, which is a combination of three rankings. Those rankings are based on how many research papers scientists have published on topics related to climate change; how often those papers are cited by other scientists in similar fields of study, such as biology, chemistry or physics; and how often those papers are referenced in the lay press, social media, policy papers and other outlets.

    More information at The Reuters Hot List

    La manca de vent que provoca el canvi climàtic pot endarrerir la caiguda de les fulles en les latituds altes

    Les dinàmiques dels vents s’han d’introduir en els estudis que mesuren com el canvi climàtic afecta els ritmes de la natura.L’estudi publicat a PNAS amb participació de Josep Peñuelas, investigador CSIC al CREAF, conclou que la calma dels vents està afavorint la productivitat de la vegetació.

    Arbre caducifoli de Suècia. Photo by Cecilia Par on Unsplash

    Arbre caducifoli de Suècia. Photo by Cecilia Par on Unsplash

    A les latituds més altes o septentrionals (de Londres cap amunt en el cas d’Europa), els vents s’han calmat degut al canvi climàtic. Això implica que ja no bufa el vent com abans als boscos boreals ni als boscos o pastures  temperades de l’hemisferi nord. Quins efectes pot tenir això sobre la vegetació i, en conseqüència, sobre el seu paper com a mitigadora del canvi climàtic? Avui, un estudi publicat al Proceeding of the National Academy of Science PNAS alerta que la manca de vent que provoca el canvi climàtic pot endarrerir l’envelliment i caiguda de les fulles en aquestes latituds. “El vent asseca les fulles i les porta cap a la senescència i caiguda típiques de la tardor. Amb menys vent aquest efecte disminueix i pot ser un dels motius que expliquin aquest alentiment”, comenta Josep Peñuelas, autor de l’article i investigador del CSIC i del CREAF.De fet, l’estudi constata que aquesta calma provocada pel canvi climàtic afecta el moment de la caiguda de les fulles de forma comparable a com ho fan la temperatura o les precipitacions, els factors més controlats fins ara en els estudis fenològics.

    De fet, l’estudi constata que aquesta calma provocada pel canvi climàtic afecta el moment de la caiguda de les fulles de forma comparable a com ho fan la temperatura o les precipitacions, els factors més controlats fins ara en els estudis fenològics. “Amb aquest estudi alertem que les dinàmiques dels vents s’han d’introduir el més aviat possible als models que s’estan fent servir arreu del món per mesurar els efectes del canvi climàtic en els ritmes de la naturalesa”, afegeix Peñuelas.

    L’estudi ha analitzat 183.448 observacions fenològiques a 2.405 emplaçaments, mesures a llarg termini de vapor d’aigua, de diòxid de carboni i 34 anys de dades de satèl·lit que mesuren la verdor del paisatge. A més, s’han comparat les diferències interanuals que s’han viscut en aquests llocs en el moment de caiguda de les fulles (la fenologia de la tardor).

    Boscos caducifolis del nord d'Europa. Foto: Landon Parenteau en UnSplash

    Boscos caducifolis del nord d’Europa. Foto: Landon Parenteau en UnSplash

    Vents, claus en el cicle del carboni

    Ara mateix, la frenada dels vents sembla tenir efectes positius sobre la producció neta dels boscos i la vegetació. Un fet positiu per mitigar el canvi climàtic, doncs com més creix el verd més CO2 retira de l’atmosfera per produir troncs, branques i fulles. Per una banda, com més temps tenen fulles les plantes, més temps fan la fotosíntesi. De l’altra, el treball demostra que la disminució dels vents redueix l’evapotranspiració, la qual cosa es tradueix en menys pèrdues d’aigua del sòl i, en conseqüència, en condicions de creixement més favorables a finals de la tardor. A més, amb menys vent hi ha menys refredament de les superfícies de les fulles i es podrien, per tant, reduir els danys per gelades.Les dinàmiques dels vents s’han d’introduir el més aviat possible als models que s’estan fent servir arreu del món per mesurar els efectes del canvi climàtic en els ritmes de la naturalesa.

    De fet, les terres no urbanitzades de les altes latituds septentrionals (> 50 °) són actualment un gran embornal de carboni, però han experimentat un gran augment de la temperatura de l’aire. Per aquest motiu, en aquests ecosistemes la productivitat neta anual ha augmentat any rere any, entre d’altres motius perquè la primavera s’ha avançat i perquè les fulles ara cauen dels arbres més tard.

    Núvols de vent

    Núvols de vent

    Tot i això, els experts alerten que el clima futur pot ser més variable, amb majors canvis en la temperatura i les precipitacions. “Predir com canviaran les velocitats de vent amb un clima canviant segueix sent un repte, però les proves suggereixen que les velocitats de vent seran més extremes en diverses regions, encara que la velocitat mitjana anual segueixi disminuint. La combinació de vents extrems i crònics tindria un impacte significatiu en el creixement de les plantes, i aquestes conseqüències per a la captació regional i global de carboni podrien arribar a ser negatives i tan importants com les derivades de les variacions de temperatura i precipitació”, alerta Peñuelas. De fet, l’estudi ha donat lloc a un algoritme millorat útil en els models que prediuen l’evolució del cicle de carboni y es dibuixa un escenari totalment contrari cap al 2100, on la caiguda de les fulles podria avançar-se un altre cop donant un efecte de bols de neu (o retroalimentació positiva) que agreujaria el mateix canvi climàtic.

    Source: Blog CREAF

    L’Ajuntament de Manresa designa en Jordi Sardans com a «ambaixador» per promocionar i projectar la ciutat

    El Saló de Sessions de l’Ajuntament de Manresa va acollir el passat 8 d’abril la primera recepció a les persones que han estat designades ambaixadores de la ciutat. Es tracta de 38 persones escollides d’entre investigadors, artistes, esportistes, comunicadors i professionals de generacions i procedències molt diverses que han excel·lit en la seva activitat i ts’han compromès de manera pública a projectar i promocionar la ciutat .

    La iniciativa pretén fer augmentar el sentiment de pertinença i, a la vegada, ajudar a donar a conèixer projectes concrets importants, com ara Manresa 2022, que commemorarà els 500 anys de l’estada d’Ignasi de Loiola a la ciutat.

    Els ambaixadors i els representants municipals, ahir al saló de sessions de l'Ajuntament de Manresa

    @Regió 7

    Font: https://www.regio7.cat/manresa/2021/04/10/laposajuntament-designa-ambaixadors-promocionar/665425.html

    Seasonal biological carryover dominates northern vegetation growth

    Biological cycles of a plant include many successional growth periods in which the past and the present are tightly connected. Figure shows schematic representation of the vegetation growth carryover (Source Lian et al Nat Comm 2021); image: Pixabay

    …………….

    The life-cycle continuity of plant growth implies that present states of vegetation growth may intrinsically affect subsequent growths, which is a type of biological memory, and can be referred to as vegetation-growth carryover (VGC). Thus, the state of ecosystems is influenced strongly by their past, and describing this carryover effect is important to accurately forecast their future behaviors. However, the processes involved in the lagged vegetation responses to precedent climate, soil, and growth conditions are highly complex and often non-linear. It should also be noted that the strength and persistence of this carryover effect on ecosystem dynamics in comparison to that of simultaneous environmental drivers are still poorly understood.

    In a new study published in the journal Nature Communications authors hypothesize that the VGC has played a critical role in regulating the seasonal-to-interannual trajectory of vegetation growth. The study quantifies the impact of VGC on North Hemisphere (NH) vegetation growth with a large set of measurements, including satellite, eddy covariance (EC), and tree-ring chronologies, and compare the size of this effect against that of immediate and lagged impacts of climate change.

    According to the authors, this work provides quantitative evidence that peak-to-late season vegetation productivity and greenness are primarily determined by a successful start of the growing season (via the interseasonal VGC effect), rather than by a transient or lagged response to climate. This carryover of seasonal vegetation productivity exerts strong positive impacts on seasonal vegetation growth over the Northern Hemisphere. “In particular, this VGC of early growing-season vegetation growth is even stronger than past and co-occurring climate on determining peak-to-late season vegetation growth, and is the primary contributor to the recently observed annual greening trend”, said Xu Lian and Shilong Piao from the College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University.

    In order to examine whether this VGC effect operates at longer time scales of multiple years, authors performed lagged partial autocorrelations with interannual anomalies of satellite-observed NDVI and 2739 standardized tree-ring width (TRW) records. For a time lag of 1 year, a positive interannual VGC was present across northern lands, with 75.6% of vegetated areas (for NDVI) and 82.9% of the tree-ring samples (for TRW) showing positive lagged correlations. This positive interannual VGC indicates that a greener year is often followed by another greener year. When the study extended the time lags extended to 2 years, the positive correlation between current year NDVI (or TRW) and that of 2 years earlier was significant for only 14% of tree-ring samples or 5% of the total vegetated area (for NDVI). If time lags of 3 years were considered, the lagged correlation was found to be close to zero (Fig. 4a). Based on this results authors conclude that the effect of seasonal VGC persists into the subsequent year but not further.

    The study also discusses process-based ecosystem models, a useful tool for predicting vegetation growth and examining the associated complex mechanisms. According to the authors, these current models greatly underestimate the VGC effect, and may therefore underestimate the CO2 sequestration potential of northern vegetation under future warming. To better simulate biological processes related to this carryover, the study highlighted that will be necessary not only using satellite and ground measurements to refine existing parameterizations, but also using leaf-level measurements to understand the physiological mechanisms controlling VGC patterns and to incorporate new process representation in model components

    “Our analyses provide new insights into how vegetation changes under global warming. The VGC effect represents a key yet often underappreciated pathway through which warmer early growing season and associated earlier plant phenology subsequently enhance plant productivity in the mid-to late growing season, which can further persist into the following year”, explains Prof. Josep Penuelas from CREAF-CSIC Barcelona while he and Prof. Shilong Piao comment between them that “their results highlight the need for improved representation of the intrinsic VGC effect in dynamic vegetation models to avoid that they greatly underestimate the VGC effect, and may therefore underestimate the CO2 sequestration potential of northern vegetation under future warming.”

    Reference: Lian, X., Piao, S., Chen, A., Wang, K., Li, X., Buermann, W., Huntingford, C., Penuelas, J., Xu, H., Myneni, R. 2020. Seasonal biological carryover dominates northern vegetation growth. Nature Communications (2021) 12:983. Doi: 10.1038/s41467-021-21223-2.

    Three Global Ecology Unit scientists in Stanford University List of Top 2% Scientists Worldwide

    Profs. Josep Peñuelas and Iolanda Filella from the Global Ecology Unit (CSIC-CREAF) have been named in the Stanford University- Elsevier list of most-cited scientists in various disciplines worldwide. The database is created by experts at Stanford University and includes 100,000 top-scientists according to standardized information on citations, h-index, co-authorship adjusted hm-index, citations to papers in different authorship positions and a composite indicator (updated to citation year 2019).  

    According to this database and for the year 2019:

    Prof. Josep Peñuelas has been nominated among the four hundred most influential scientists in all fields and among the ten most influential scientists in ecological and environmental sciences (Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford – METRICS)

    Prof. Iolanda Filella has been nominated among the eight hundred most influential scientists in plant biology (Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford – METRICS)

    Prof. Jordi Sardans had been nominated among the six hundred most influential scientists in ecological and environmental sciences (Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford – METRICS)

    The greening of the earth is approaching its limit

    A new study published in Science reveals that the fertilizing effect of excess CO2 on vegetation is decreasing worldwide. The lack of water and nutrients limit the greening observed in recent years and can cause CO2 levels in the atmosphere to rise rapidly, temperatures to increase and there to be increasingly severe changes in the climate.

    The greening of the earth is approaching its limit

    The lack of water and nutrients limit the greening observed in recent years and can cause CO2 levels in the atmosphere to rise temperatures to increase and to increase severe changes in the climate. Image: Public Domain

    Vegetation has a key role in mitigating climate change because it reduces the excess CO2 that we humans emit into the atmosphere. Just as when sportsmen and women are doped with oxygen, plants also benefit from the large amounts of CO2 that accumulate in the atmosphere. If more CO2 is available, they photosynthesize and grow more, which is called the fertilizing effect of CO2. When plants absorb this gas to grow, they remove it from the atmosphere and it is sequestered in their branches, trunk or roots.

    An article published in Science on December 2020 shows that this fertilizing effect of CO2 is decreasing worldwide, according to the text co-directed by Professor Josep Peñuelas of the CSIC at CREAF and Professors Songhan Wang (first author of the article) and Yongguang Zhang of the University of Nanjin, with the participation of CREAF researchers Jordi Sardans and Marcos Fernández. The study, carried out by an international team, concludes that the reduction has reached 50% progressively since 1982 due basically to two key factors: the availability of water and nutrients. “There is no mystery about the formula, plants need CO2, water and nutrients in order to grow. However much the CO2 increases, if the nutrients and water do not increase in parallel, the plants will not be able to take advantage of the increase in this gas”, explains Professor Josep Peñuelas. In fact, three years ago Prof. Peñuelas already warned in an article in Nature Ecology and Evolution that the fertilising effect of CO2 would not last forever, that plants cannot grow indefinitely, because there are other factors that limit them.

    If the fertilizing capacity of CO2 decreases, there will be strong consequences on the carbon cycle and therefore on the climate. Forests have received a veritable CO2 bonus for decades, which has allowed them to sequester tons of carbon dioxide that enabled them to do more photosynthesis and grow more. In fact, this increased sequestration has managed to reduce the CO2 accumulated in the air, but now it is over. “These unprecedented results indicate that the absorption of carbon by vegetation is beginning to become saturated. This has very important climate implications that must be taken into account in possible climate change mitigation strategies and policies at the global level. Nature’s capacity to sequester carbon is decreasing and with it society’s dependence on future strategies to curb greenhouse gas emissions is increasing”, warns Josep Peñuelas.

    The study published in Science has been carried out using satellite, atmospheric, ecosystem and modelling information. It highlights the use of sensors that use near-infrared and fluorescence and are thus capable of measuring vegetation growth activity.  

    Less water and nutrients

    According to the results, the lack of water and nutrients are the two factors that reduce the capacity of CO2 to improve plant growth. To reach this conclusion, the team based itself on data obtained from hundreds of forests studied over the last 40 years. “These data show that concentrations of essential nutrients in the leaves, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, have also progressively decreased since 1990,” explains researcher Songhan Wang.

    The team has also found that water availability and temporal changes in water supply play a significant role in this phenomenon. “We have found that plants slow down their growth, not only in times of drought, but also when there are changes in the seasonality of rainfall, which is increasingly happening with climate change,” explains researcher Yongguang Zhang.

    Reference article:

    Wang S, Zhang YG, Ju W, Chen, J, Ciais P, Cescatti A, Sardans J, Janssens IA, Sardans, J, Fernández-Martínez, M, … Penuelas J (2020). Recent global decline of CO2 fertilization effects on vegetation photosynthesis. Science, DOI: 10.1126/science.abb7772

    Source: Blog CREAF

    Country-Level Relationships of the Human Intake of N and P, Animal and Vegetable Food, and Alcoholic Beverages with Cancer and Life Expectancy


    The quantity, quality, and type (e.g., animal and vegetable) of human food and beverages have been correlated with cancer and life expectancy, although mostly at the population level and with many uncertainties. In a new study published in the journal Environmental Research and Human Health authors shed light on this association at country level. Picture source https://www.helpguide.org/

    The quantity, quality, and type (e.g., animal and vegetable) of human food have been correlated with human health, although with some contradictory or neutral results. We aimed to shed light on this association by using the integrated data at country level.

    In a new study published in the journal Environmental Research and Human Health authors hypothesized that higher N intake, lower N:P intake ratios, terrestrial animal food, and alcoholic beverages would be associated with cancer and shorter life expectancy (LE), whereas on the contrary, aquatic animals and vegetables would be associated with less cancer and longer LE.

    The study correlated elemental (nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) compositions and stoichiometries (N:P ratios), molecular (proteins) and energetic traits (kilocalories) of food of animal (terrestrial or aquatic) and vegetable origin, and alcoholic beverages with cancer prevalence and mortality and LE at birth at the country level.

    Researchers used the official databases of United Nations (UN), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), World Bank, World Health Organization (WHO), U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Health, and Eurobarometer, while also considering other possibly involved variables such as income, mean age, or human development index of each country.

    The per capita intakes of N, P, protein, and total intake from terrestrial animals, and especially alcohol were significantly and positively associated with prevalence and mortality from total, colon, lung, breast, and prostate cancers. In contrast, high per capita intakes of vegetable N, P, N:P, protein, and total plant intake exhibited negative relationships with cancer prevalence and mortality. However, authors highlighted that a high LE at birth, especially in underdeveloped countries was more strongly correlated with a higher intake of food, independent of its animal or vegetable origin, than with other variables, such as higher income or the human development index.

    “Our analyses, thus, yielded four generally consistent conclusions. First, the excessive intake of terrestrial animal food, especially the levels of protein, N, and P, is associated with higher prevalence of cancer, whereas equivalent intake from vegetables is associated with lower prevalence. Second, no consistent relationship was found for food N:P ratio and cancer prevalence. Third, the consumption of alcoholic beverages correlates with prevalence and mortality by malignant neoplasms. Fourth, in underdeveloped countries, reducing famine has a greater positive impact on health and LE than a healthier diet”, concluded Prof. Josep Penuelas from CREAF-CSIC Barcelona.

    Reference: Penuelas, J., Krisztin, T., Obersteiner, M., Huber, F., Winner, H., Janssens, I.A., Ciais, P., Sardans, J. 2020. Country level relationships of the human intake of N and P, animal and vegetable food and alcoholic beverages with cancer and life expectancy. Environmental Research and Human Health, 2020, 17, 7240; doi:10.3390/ijerph17197240.

  •  
    Loading RSS Feed
  •  
    Loading RSS Feed
  •  
    Loading RSS Feed