Outreach

  • Change in plant functional traits across a warming tundra biome

    Bjorkman_et al_Nature_2018_Fig_v2
    a) The tundra is warming more rapidly than any other biome on Earth, and the potential ramifications are far-reaching due to global-scale vegetation-climate feedbacks Picture by: Pixabay. b) Map of all 56,048 tundra trait records and vegetation survey sites. Figure by Bjorkman et al., extracted from their publication in the journal Nature.

     

    Rapid climate warming in Arctic and alpine regions is driving changes in the structure and composition of tundra plant communities, with unknown consequences for ecosystem functioning. Up to 50% of the world’s belowground carbon stocks are contained in permafrost soils, and tundra regions are expected to contribute the majority of warming-induced soil carbon loss over the next century.

    Plant functional traits are directly related to vital ecosystem processes such as primary productivity and decomposition, so understanding trait-environment relationships is critical to predict high-latitude climate feedbacks, and yet such relationships have never been quantified at the biome scale. Quantifying the link between environment and plant functional traits is thus critical to understand the consequences of climate change, but such studies rarely extend into the tundra. As such, the full extent of the relationship between climate and plant traits in the planet’s coldest ecosystems has never been assessed, and the consequences of climate warming for tundra functional change are largely unknown.

    In a new study in the journal Nature authors explore the biome-wide relationship between temperature, soil moisture, and key plant functional traits (plant height, leaf area, leaf nitrogen content (leaf N), specific leaf area (SLA), and leaf dry matter content (LDMC), as well as community woodiness and evergreenness.

    Authors integrated more than 56,000 trait observations with nearly three decades of plant community vegetation surveys at 117 Arctic and alpine tundra sites spanning the northern hemisphere. “We found strong spatial relationships between summer temperature and community height, SLA, and LDMC. Soil moisture had a marked influence on the strength (SLA and LDMC) and direction (leaf area and leaf N) of the temperature-trait relationship, highlighting the potentially important influence of changes in water availability on future plant trait change”, said Dr. Grau from CREAF-CSIC Barcelona.

    Over the past three decades, community plant height increased with warming across all sites, but other traits lagged far behind rates of change predicted from spatial temperature-trait relationships. The findings of this study highlight the challenge of using space-for-time substitution to predict the consequences of future warming on functional composition and suggest that tundra ecosystem functions tied closely to plant height (e.g., carbon uptake) will show the most rapid changes with near-term climate warming.

    “Our results reveal the strength with which environmental factors shape biotic communities at the coldest extremes of the planet and will enable improved projections of tundra functional change with climate warming”, said Prof. Josep Peñuelas from CREAF-CSIC Barcelona.

     

    Reference: Bjorkman , A., Myers-Smith, I., Elmendorf, S., Normand, S., Rüger, N., Beck, P.S.A., Blach-Overgaard, A., Blok8, D., Cornelissen, J.H.C., Forbes, B.C., Georges, D., Goetz, S., Guay, K., Henry, G.H.R., HilleRisLambers, J., Hollister, R., Karger, D.N., Kattge, J., Prevéy, J.S., Rixen, C., Schaepman-Strub, G., Thomas, H., Vellend, M., Wilmking, M., Wipf, S., Carbognani, M., Hermanutz, L., Levesque, E., Molau, U., Petraglia, A., Soudzilovskaia, N.A., Spasojevic, M., Tomaselli, M., Vowles, T., Alata, J., Alexander, H., Anadon-Rosell, A., Angers-Blondin, S., Te Beest, T., Berner, L., Björk, R.G., Buchwal, A., Buras, A., Christie, K., Collier, L.S., Cooper, E.J., Dullinger, S., Elberling, B., Eskelinen, A., Frei, E.R., Iturrate Garcia, M., Grau, O., Grogan, P., Hallinger, M., Harper, K., Heijmans, M., Hudson, J., Hülber, K., Iversen, C.M., Jaroszynska, F., Johnstone, J., Halfdan Jorgensen, R., Kaarlejärvi, E., Klady, R., Kuleza, S., Kulonen, A., Lamarque, L.J., Lantz, T., Lavalle, A., Little, C.J., Mervyn Speed, J.D., Michelsen, A., Milbau, A., Nabe-Nielsen, J., Schøler Nielsen, S., Ninot, J.M., Oberbauer, S., Olofsson, J., Onipchenko, V.G., Rumpf, S.B., Semenchuk, P., Shetti, R., Street, L., Suding, K., Tape, K., Trant, A., Treier, U., Tremblay, J.P., Tremblay, M., Venn, A., Weijers, S., Zamin, T., Boulanger-Lapointe, N., Gould, W.A., Hik, D., Hofgaard, A., Svala Jonsdottir, I., Jorgenson, J., Klein, J., Magnusson, B., Tweedie, C., Wookey, P.A., Bahn, M., Blonder, B., van Bodegom, P., Bond-Lamberty, B., Campetella, G., Cerabolini, B.E.L., Stuart Chapin III, F., Cornwell, W., Craine, J., Dainese, M., de Vries, F.T., Diaz, S., Enquist, B.J., Green, W., Manning, P., Milla, R., Niinemets, U., Onoda, Y., Ordonez, J., Ozinga, W.A., Penuelas, J., Poorter, H., Poschlod, P., Reich, P., Sandel, B., Schamp, B., Sheremetev, S., Weiher, E. 2018. Changes in plant functional traits across a warming tundra biome. Nature, doi: doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0563-7


    ,

    New plants on the block: Taller species are taking over in a warming Arctic

    Until now, the Arctic tundra has been the domain of low-growing grasses and dwarf shrubs. Defying the harsh conditions, these plants huddle close to the ground and often grow only a few centimeters high. But new, taller plant species have been slowly taking over this chilly neighborhood, report an international group of nearly 130 biologists led by scientists from the German Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) with the participation of researchers from CSIC-CREAF today in “Nature”. This has led to an overall increase in the height of tundra plant communities over the past three decades.

     

    Anthoxanthum odoratum

    This is due in part to new, taller species spreading into the tundra. Vernal sweetgrass (Anthoxanthum odoratum), common in lowland Europe, has newly appeared in alpine sites in Iceland and Sweden. Photo: Christian Fische licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

     

    The study, initiated by a team of researchers supported through the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), analyzed the most comprehensive data set on plants in the Arctic tundra available. The study encompassed almost 120 tundra sites, most of them located in Arctic regions of Alaska, Canada, Iceland, Scandinavia and Siberia.  “The increase in height we saw was not just in a few sites but nearly everywhere,” says lead author Dr. Anne Bjorkman, who now works at the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre and who conducted the study at the iDiv research centre, the University of Edinburgh, and Aarhus University.  The researchers identify climate warming as the underlying cause. Temperatures in the Arctic have risen by about 1 degree Celsius in summer and 1.5 degrees in winter over the three decades covered by the study, some of the fastest rates of warming on the planet. A detailed analysis showed that not only do individual plants grow taller with warmer temperatures, but that the plant community itself has also shifted. “Taller plant species, either from warmer pockets within the tundra or from southern or lower elevation areas, have spread across the tundra”, says Prof. Josep Penuelas, from CSIC-CREAF.  This move is far from over, as Bjorkman points out: “If taller plants continue to spread at the current rate, the plant community height couldpermafrost underlying tundra vegetation contains one-third to half of the world’s soil carbon. When the permafrost thaws, greenhouse gases could thus be released. An increase in taller plants could speed up this process as taller plants trap more snow in winter, which insulates the underlying soil and prevents it from freezing quickly and deeply in winter.

    “Although there are still many uncertainties, taller tundra plants could fuel climate change, both in the Arctic and for the planet as a whole”, said Dr. Oriol Grau from CREAF.

     

    Dryas integrifolia

    Surprisingly, comparably shorter species that are typical of the Arctic, such as mountain avens (Dryas integrifolia), are not declining. Photo: Anne Bjorkman

     

    The study, initiated by a team of researchers supported through the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), analyzed the most comprehensive data set on plants in the Arctic tundra available. The study encompassed almost 120 tundra sites, most of them located in Arctic regions of Alaska, Canada, Iceland, Scandinavia and Siberia.  “The increase in height we saw was not just in a few sites but nearly everywhere,” says lead author Dr. Anne Bjorkman, who now works at the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre and who conducted the study at the iDiv research centre, the University of Edinburgh, and Aarhus University.  The researchers identify climate warming as the underlying cause. Temperatures in the Arctic have risen by about 1 degree Celsius in summer and 1.5 degrees in winter over the three decades covered by the study, some of the fastest rates of warming on the planet. A detailed analysis showed that not only do individual plants grow taller with warmer temperatures, but that the plant community itself has also shifted. “Taller plant species, either from warmer pockets within the tundra or from southern or lower elevation areas, have spread across the tundra”, says Prof. Josep Penuelas, from CSIC-CREAF.

    This move is far from over, as Bjorkman points out: “If taller plants continue to spread at the current rate, the plant community height could increase by 20 to 60% by the end of the century.” Surprisingly, the researchers found no evidence that this “invasion” of taller species is currently leading to a decline in shorter species.

     

    Fieldwork on Ellesmere Island, Canada

    Fieldwork on Ellesmere Island, Canada: Measuring the size of individual plants. The study combines over 50,000 individual plant measurements with 30 years of plant community monitoring to understand how tundra ecosystems are responding to warmer temperatures. Photo: Anne Bjorkman

     

    Arctic regions have long been a focus for climate change research, as the permafrost underlying tundra vegetation contains one-third to half of the world’s soil carbon. When the permafrost thaws, greenhouse gases could thus be released. An increase in taller plants could speed up this process as taller plants trap more snow in winter, which insulates the underlying soil and prevents it from freezing quickly and deeply in winter.

    “Although there are still many uncertainties, taller tundra plants could fuel climate change, both in the Arctic and for the planet as a whole”, said Dr. Oriol Grau from CREAF.

    In contrast to plant height, researchers found that six other measures, such as the size of leaves and their nitrogen content, showed no consistent change over the last thirty years. These other plant characteristics were strongly influenced by moisture levels in addition to temperature.

    The researchers conclude that the response of the plant community as a whole to climate warming will depend on whether the tundra becomes wetter or drier over time. Rüger says: “In order to predict how the plant community in the tundra will react in the future, it is necessary to not only take into account alterations in temperature, but also in water availability. If precipitation or the water cycle change, or if the timing of snowmelt shifts, this may have severe effects on the tundra vegetation.”

    Press images may be used at no cost for editorial reporting, provided that the original author’s name is published as well. The images may only be passed on to third parties in the context of current reporting. This press release and the images are also available at www.senckenberg.de/presse

    Bjorkman, A. et al. Plant functional trait change across a warming tundra biome. Nature, doi: doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0563-7

     

    Observaciones vía satélite desvelan los secretos del reverdecimiento de los bosques tropicales secos

    Canopy_forest_July2018
    El agua almacenada en los tejidos de las plantas es fundamental para el funcionamiento de los ecosistemas terrestres, por su participación en el metabolismo de las plantas, en el transporte de nutrientes y carbohidratos así como para el mantenimiento de la integridad del sistema hidráulico de las plantas. Foto: Pixabay

     

    En los bosques tropicales secos las plantas se empapan de agua cuando termina la estación lluviosa y la almacenan durante el periodo más seco del año. Esta gran cantidad de agua almacenada permite a los árboles desarrollar sus hojas aproximadamente un mes antes de la siguiente estación de lluvias. Este sorprendente resultado sale a la luz por primera vez, gracias a las observaciones obtenidas por satélite y realizadas principalmente en la región africana de Miombo (aproximadamente 4 veces la superficie de Francia), en un estudio publicado en la revista Nature Ecology and Evolution. Estos trabajos permitirán mejorar los Modelos del Sistema Terrestre (que no consideran suficientemente los mecanismos hidráulicos de las plantas) así como las predicciones del clima futuro y del ciclo del agua en estas regiones del mundo.

    ¿Qué relación existe entre el contenido de agua de las plantas y el desarrollo de las hojas? ¿Ambas variables se hallan estrechamente vinculadas en el tiempo y el espacio a lo largo de la superficie terrestre? Estas cuestiones son clave para mejorar la toma en consideración de la interacción vegetación-atmósfera en los Modelos del Sistema Terrestre y predecir la respuesta de los ecosistemas al cambio climático.

     

    Hallazgos en el bosque tropical africano de Miombo

    Los trabajos realizados por la Universidad de Copenhague y el INRA, en colaboración con el CREAF-CSIC Barcelona, CEA, el CNRS, el CNES, y Bordeaux Sciences Agro, han demostrado mediante observaciones satélite que las variaciones estacionales en cuanto al contenido de agua de las plantas y al desarrollo de las hojas son altamente sincrónicas en las regiones boreales y templadas. En cambio, sorprende que dichas variaciones sean altamente asíncronas en los bosques tropicales secos, donde el aumento de las cantidades de agua almacenada en la planta precede al reverdecimiento de la vegetación (“vegetation greening”) entre 25 y 180 días. Los trabajos se han centrado en la región forestal de Miombo, que abarca una inmensa superficie de más de 2,7 millones de km2 al sur de la selva ecuatorial africana. En esta región, las observaciones por satélite muestran claramente que el índice de área foliar (LAI) empieza a aumentar varias semanas antes del inicio de la temporada de lluvias, una clara señal del reverdecimiento “pre-lluvias” que ya ha sido documentado en numerosos estudios. “Los mecanismos implicados en este fenómeno aún no se conocen del todo pero es probable que supongan costes energéticos importantes para las plantas: estas deben desarrollar tanto su sistema radicular, para acceder al agua en capas profundas del suelo, como sus tallos leñosos, para aumentar su capacidad de almacenamiento”, comenta el Dr. Feng Tian de la Lund University, Suecia.

    La novedad en este caso viene dada por las observaciones del índice L-VOD (espesor óptico de la vegetación en banda L) —un valioso indicador de la dinámica del contenido de agua de las plantas, obtenido gracias a los datos del satélite SMOS de la ESA (Agencia Espacial Europea) y el CNES—, que muestran que la vegetación de Miombo se empapa de agua al terminar la estación de lluvias (cuando disminuyen las pérdidas de agua por transpiración) y que ese agua se almacena en los tejidos leñosos durante la mayor parte de la estación seca hasta la aparición de las hojas nuevas, varias semanas antes de las primeras lluvias de la estación húmeda. “Esta aparición precoz de las hojas tiene ventajas fisiológicas y ecológicas, reduciéndose considerablemente el desfase temporal existente entre el inicio de la estación de lluvias y la actividad fotosintética”, indica el Prof. Rasmus Frensholt de la University of Copenhagen, Dinamarca.

    Este sorprendente comportamiento hidráulico ya había sido observado en experimentos in situ realizados con algunos árboles de bosques tropicales secos, particularmente en Costa Rica. Sin embargo, este nuevo estudio es el primero en demostrar que se trata en realidad de un fenómeno a gran escala, visible en regiones forestales tan vastas como la selva de Miombo, así como en regiones del norte del África ecuatorial o en El Cerrado (Brasil).

    Por otra parte, estos procesos fisiológicos e hidrológicos aún no se han incorporado en los Modelos del Sistema Terrestre. “Nuestros resultados ofrecen nuevas ideas de las relaciones globales planta-agua a escala ecosistémica y proporcionan una base para mejorar la parametrización de los modelos eco-hidrológicos y de los Modelos del Sistema Terrestre. El nuevo conjunto de datos L-VOD será clave para mejorar la próxima generación de estos modelos, lo que dará lugar a mejores predicciones del clima futuro y del ciclo del agua en estas regiones del mundo”, indica el Prof. Josep Peñuelas del CREAF-CSIC.
    Acoplamiento temporal entre la estacionalidad del índice L-VOD y la del índice de área foliar (LAI): desfase temporal para que L-VOD registre la mayor correlación con el LAI para píxeles que muestran una estacionalidad bien diferenciada. El rectángulo negro abarca la región boscosa de Miombo. © Universidad de Copenhague, F. Tian

     

    Un arsenal de observaciones satelitales

    Este estudio está basado en una amplia gama de observaciones satelitales que tienen por objeto caracterizar las variaciones temporales de los parámetros clave del ciclo hidrológico y de la vegetación a escala de ecosistema. Los investigadores han contado con un nuevo conjunto de datos SMOS-IC sobre el índice L-VOD (L-band vegetation optical depth), extraído de las observaciones espaciales del satélite europeo SMOS de la AEE-CNES. Este índice está estrechamente relacionado con el contenido en agua de la vegetación (kg/m2) del conjunto del dosel arbóreo. Más concretamente, junto al L-VOD, indicador del contenido de agua de la vegetación, las otras variables consideradas en el estudio son: el índice de área foliar (leaf area index, LAI), obtenido gracias a observaciones satelitales ópticas y empleado para caracterizar la fenología foliar; las anomalías en el almacenamiento de agua terrestre (TWS, en inglés), calculadas con satélites GRACE; o la humedad del suelo, las precipitaciones y los flujos de transpiración. Las observaciones de la humedad del suelo consideradas aquí se calcularon al mismo tiempo que el índice L-VOD a partir de observaciones multiangulares del satélite SMOS.

    Variaciones estacionales en el bosque tropical seco de Miombo, África (2011-2012) en cuanto al contenido en agua de las plantas (L-VOD), el índice de área foliar (LAI) y las precipitaciones en una región de 1°×1° (centrada en 11.5° S, 18.5° E). Las zonas grises indican la estación seca. © Universidad de Copenhague, F. Tian.

    Cuando se calcula su promedio a escala anual, el índice L-VOD está íntimamente relacionado con la biomasa aérea de la vegetación, una característica que se ha utilizado recientemente para cuantificar los cambios en las reservas de carbono de la vegetación en el continente africano. Más información: http://presse.inra.fr/Communiques-de-presse/un-nouvel-outil-pour-suivre-le-bilan-carbone-de-la-vegetation

    Referencia

    Tian, J.-P. Wigneron, P. Ciais, J. Chave, J. Ogée, J. Peñuelas, A. Ræbild, J-C Domec, X. Tong, M. Brandt, A. Mialon, N. Rodriguez-Fernandez, T. Tagesson, A. Al-Yaari, Y. Kerr, C. Chen, R. B. Myneni, W. Zhang, J. Ardö, R. Fensholt, Coupling of ecosystem-scale plant water storage and leaf phenology observed by satellite, Nature Ecology & Evolution, 13 août 2018 – https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-018-0630-3

    Observacions via satèl·lit desvelen els secrets del reverdiment dels boscos tropicals secs

    Canopy_forest_July2018
    L’aigua emmagatzemada als teixits de les plantes és fonamental per al funcionament dels ecosistemes terrestres mitjançant la seva participació al metabolisme de les plantes, al transport de nutrients i carbohidrats, així com per al manteniment de la integritat del sistema hidràulic de les plantes. Foto: Pixabay

     

    Als boscos tropicals secs les plantes s’amaren d’aigua quan acaba l’estació plujosa i l’emmagatzemen durant el període més sec de l’any. Aquesta gran quantitat d’aigua emmagatzemada permet als arbres desenvolupar les seves fulles aproximadament un mes abans que comenci la següent estació de pluges. Aquest resultat sorprenent surt a la llum per primera vegada, gràcies a les observacions obtingudes per satèl·lit i realitzades principalment a la regió africana de Miombo (aproximadament 4 cops la superfície de França), en un estudi publicat per la revista Nature Ecology and Evolution. Aquests treballs permetran millorar els Models del Sistema Terrestre (que no consideren suficientment els mecanismes hidràulics de les plantes) així com les prediccions del clima futur i del cicle de l’aigua en aquestes regions del món.

    ¿Quina relació existeix entre el contingut d’aigua de les plantes i el desenvolupament de les fulles? ¿Ambdues variables es troben estretament vinculades en el temps i l’espai al llarg de la superfície terrestre? Aquestes qüestions són clau per millorar en la consideració de la interacció vegetació-atmosfera als Models del Sistema Terrestre i predir la resposta dels ecosistemes al canvi climàtic.

    Troballes al bosc tropical de Miombo

    Els treballs realitzats per la University of Copenhagen i l’INRA, en col·laboració amb el CREAF-CSIC Barcelona, CEA, el CNRS, el CNES, i Bordeaux Sciences Agro, han demostrat mitjançant observacions satèl·lit que les variacions estacionals del contingut d’aigua de les plantes y el desenvolupament de les fulles són altament sincrònics en les regions boreals i temperades. En canvi, sorprèn que aquestes variacions siguin altament asíncrones als boscos tropicals secs, on l’increment de les quantitats d’aigua emmagatzemada en la planta precedeixen el reverdiment de la vegetació (“vegetation greening”) entre 25 i 180 dies. Els treballs s’han centrat a la regió forestal de Miombo, que abasta una immensa superfície de més de 2,7 milions de km2 al Sud de la selva equatorial africana. En aquesta regió, les observacions per satèl·lit mostren clarament que l’índex d’àrea foliar (LAI) comença a augmentar diverses setmanes abans del començament de la temporada de pluges, un clar senyal del reverdiment “pre-pluges” que ja ha estat documentat en nombrosos estudis. “Els mecanismes implicats en aquest fenomen encara no es coneixen del tot però és probable que suposin importants costos energètics per a las plantes: aquestes han de desenvolupar tant el seu sistema radicular, per tal d’accedir a l’aigua situada a les capes profundes del sòl, com les seves tiges llenyoses, per tal d’augmentar la seva capacitat d’emmagatzematge”, comenta el Dr. Feng Tian de la Lund University, Suècia.

    La novetat en aquest cas ve donada per les observacions de l’índex L-VOD (espessor òptic de la vegetació en banda L) —un valuós indicador de la dinàmica del contingut d’aigua de les plantes, obtingut gràcies a les dades del satèl·lit SMOS de l’ESA (Agència Espacial Europea) i el CNES—, que mostren que la vegetació de Miombo s’amara d’aigua en acabar l’estació de pluges (quan disminueixen les pèrdues d’aigua per transpiració) i que aquesta aigua s’emmagatzema als teixits llenyosos durant la major part de l’estació seca fins a l’aparició de las fulles noves, varies setmanes abans de les primeres pluges de l’estació humida. “Aquesta aparició precoç de les fulles té avantatges fisiològiques i ecològiques, reduint-se considerablement el desfasament temporal existent entre l’inici de l’estació de pluges i l’activitat fotosintètica”, indica el Prof. Rasmus Frensholt de la University of Copenhagen, Dinamarca.

    Aquest sorprenent comportament hidràulic ja s’havia observat en experiments in situ realitzats amb alguns arbres de boscos tropicals secs, particularment a Costa Rica. No obstant això, aquest nou estudi és el primer a demostrar que es tracte en realitat d’un fenomen a gran escala, visible a regions forestals tan extenses com la selva de Miombo, així com en regions del Nord de l’Àfrica equatorial o en El Cerrado (Brasil).

    D’altra banda, aquests processos fisiològics i hidrològics encara no s’han incorporat als Models del Sistema Terrestre. “Els nostres resultats ofereixen noves idees de les relacions globals planta-aigua a escala ecosistèmica i proporcionen una base per millorar la parametrització dels models eco-hidrològics i dels Models del Sistema Terrestre. El nou conjunt de dades L-VOD serà clau per millorar la pròxima generació d’aquests models, el que donarà lloc a millors prediccions del clima futur i del cicle de l’aigua en aquestes regions del món”, indica el Prof. Josep Peñuelas del CREAF-CSIC.
    Acoblament temporal entre l’estacionalitat de l’índex L-VOD i la de l’índex d’àrea foliar (LAI): desfasament temporal per a que L-VOD registri la major correlació amb el LAI per píxels que mostren una estacionalitat ben diferenciada. El rectangle negre abraça la regió boscosa de Miombo. © Universitat de Copenhaguen, F. Tian

     

    Un arsenal d’observacions satèl·lit

    Aquest estudi està basat en una àmplia gama d’observacions satèl·lit que tenen per objectiu caracteritzar les variacions temporals dels paràmetres clau del cicle hidrològic i de la vegetació a escala de l’ecosistema. Els investigadors han comptat amb un nou conjunt de dades SMOS-IC sobre l’índex L-VOD (L-band vegetation optical depth), extret de les observacions espacials del satèl·lit europeu SMOS de l’AEE-CNES. Aquest índex està estretament relacionat amb el contingut en aigua de la vegetació (kg/m2) del conjunt de la coberta arbòria. Més concretament, juntament al L-VOD, indicador del contingut d’aigua de la vegetació, les altres variables considerades en l’estudi són: l’índex d’àrea foliar (leaf area index, LAI), obtingut gràcies a observacions òptiques satèl·lit i utilitzat per caracteritzar la fenologia foliar; les anomalies en l’emmagatzematge d’aigua terrestre (TWS, en anglès), calculades amb satèl·lit GRACE; o la humitat del sòl, les precipitacions i els fluxos de transpiració. Les observacions de la humitat del sòl considerades aquí es van calcular al mateix temps que l’índex L-VOD a partir d’observacions multiangulars del satèl·lit SMOS.
    Variacions estacionals al bosc tropical sec de Miombo, Àfrica (2011-2012) en quan al contingut en aigua de les plantes (L-VOD), l’índex d’àrea foliar (LAI) i les precipitacions en una regió de 1°×1° (centrada en 11.5° S, 18.5° E). Les zones grises indiquen l’estació seca. © University of Copenhagen F. Tian

    Quan es calcula la seva mitjana a escala anual, l’índex L-VOD està íntimament relacionat amb la biomassa aèria de la vegetació, una característica que s’ha utilitzat recentment per a quantificar els canvis en les reserves de carboni de la vegetació en el continent africà. Més informació: http://presse.inra.fr/Communiques-de-presse/un-nouvel-outil-pour-suivre-le-bilan-carbone-de-la-vegetation

    Referencia

    Tian, J.-P. Wigneron, P. Ciais, J. Chave, J. Ogée, J. Peñuelas, A. Ræbild, J-C Domec, X. Tong, M. Brandt, A. Mialon, N. Rodriguez-Fernandez, T. Tagesson, A. Al-Yaari, Y. Kerr, C. Chen, R. B. Myneni, W. Zhang, J. Ardö, R. Fensholt, Coupling of ecosystem-scale plant water storage and leaf phenology observed by satellite, Nature Ecology & Evolution, 13 août 2018 – https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-018-0630-3

    Observaciones vía satélite desvelan los secretos del reverdecimiento de los bosques tropicales secos

    Canopy_forest_July2018
    El agua almacenada en los tejidos de las plantas es fundamental para el funcionamiento de los ecosistemas terrestres, por su participación en el metabolismo de las plantas, en el transporte de nutrientes y carbohidratos así como para el mantenimiento de la integridad del sistema hidráulico de las plantas. Foto: Pixabay

     

    En los bosques tropicales secos las plantas se empapan de agua cuando termina la estación lluviosa y la almacenan durante el periodo más seco del año. Esta gran cantidad de agua almacenada permite a los árboles desarrollar sus hojas aproximadamente un mes antes de la siguiente estación de lluvias. Este sorprendente resultado sale a la luz por primera vez, gracias a las observaciones obtenidas por satélite y realizadas principalmente en la región africana de Miombo (aproximadamente 4 veces la superficie de Francia), en un estudio publicado en la revista Nature Ecology and Evolution. Estos trabajos permitirán mejorar los Modelos del Sistema Terrestre (que no consideran suficientemente los mecanismos hidráulicos de las plantas) así como las predicciones del clima futuro y del ciclo del agua en estas regiones del mundo.

    ¿Qué relación existe entre el contenido de agua de las plantas y el desarrollo de las hojas? ¿Ambas variables se hallan estrechamente vinculadas en el tiempo y el espacio a lo largo de la superficie terrestre? Estas cuestiones son clave para mejorar la toma en consideración de la interacción vegetación-atmósfera en los Modelos del Sistema Terrestre y predecir la respuesta de los ecosistemas al cambio climático.

     

    Hallazgos en el bosque tropical africano de Miombo

    Los trabajos realizados por la Universidad de Copenhague y el INRA, en colaboración con el CREAF-CSIC Barcelona, CEA, el CNRS, el CNES, y Bordeaux Sciences Agro, han demostrado mediante observaciones satélite que las variaciones estacionales en cuanto al contenido de agua de las plantas y al desarrollo de las hojas son altamente sincrónicas en las regiones boreales y templadas. En cambio, sorprende que dichas variaciones sean altamente asíncronas en los bosques tropicales secos, donde el aumento de las cantidades de agua almacenada en la planta precede al reverdecimiento de la vegetación (“vegetation greening”) entre 25 y 180 días. Los trabajos se han centrado en la región forestal de Miombo, que abarca una inmensa superficie de más de 2,7 millones de km2 al sur de la selva ecuatorial africana. En esta región, las observaciones por satélite muestran claramente que el índice de área foliar (LAI) empieza a aumentar varias semanas antes del inicio de la temporada de lluvias, una clara señal del reverdecimiento “pre-lluvias” que ya ha sido documentado en numerosos estudios. “Los mecanismos implicados en este fenómeno aún no se conocen del todo pero es probable que supongan costes energéticos importantes para las plantas: estas deben desarrollar tanto su sistema radicular, para acceder al agua en capas profundas del suelo, como sus tallos leñosos, para aumentar su capacidad de almacenamiento”, comenta el Dr. Feng Tian de la Lund University, Suecia.

    La novedad en este caso viene dada por las observaciones del índice L-VOD (espesor óptico de la vegetación en banda L) —un valioso indicador de la dinámica del contenido de agua de las plantas, obtenido gracias a los datos del satélite SMOS de la ESA (Agencia Espacial Europea) y el CNES—, que muestran que la vegetación de Miombo se empapa de agua al terminar la estación de lluvias (cuando disminuyen las pérdidas de agua por transpiración) y que ese agua se almacena en los tejidos leñosos durante la mayor parte de la estación seca hasta la aparición de las hojas nuevas, varias semanas antes de las primeras lluvias de la estación húmeda. “Esta aparición precoz de las hojas tiene ventajas fisiológicas y ecológicas, reduciéndose considerablemente el desfase temporal existente entre el inicio de la estación de lluvias y la actividad fotosintética”, indica el Prof. Rasmus Frensholt de la University of Copenhagen, Dinamarca.

    Este sorprendente comportamiento hidráulico ya había sido observado en experimentos in situ realizados con algunos árboles de bosques tropicales secos, particularmente en Costa Rica. Sin embargo, este nuevo estudio es el primero en demostrar que se trata en realidad de un fenómeno a gran escala, visible en regiones forestales tan vastas como la selva de Miombo, así como en regiones del norte del África ecuatorial o en El Cerrado (Brasil).

    Por otra parte, estos procesos fisiológicos e hidrológicos aún no se han incorporado en los Modelos del Sistema Terrestre. “Nuestros resultados ofrecen nuevas ideas de las relaciones globales planta-agua a escala ecosistémica y proporcionan una base para mejorar la parametrización de los modelos eco-hidrológicos y de los Modelos del Sistema Terrestre. El nuevo conjunto de datos L-VOD será clave para mejorar la próxima generación de estos modelos, lo que dará lugar a mejores predicciones del clima futuro y del ciclo del agua en estas regiones del mundo”, indica el Prof. Josep Peñuelas del CREAF-CSIC.
    Acoplamiento temporal entre la estacionalidad del índice L-VOD y la del índice de área foliar (LAI): desfase temporal para que L-VOD registre la mayor correlación con el LAI para píxeles que muestran una estacionalidad bien diferenciada. El rectángulo negro abarca la región boscosa de Miombo. © Universidad de Copenhague, F. Tian

     

    Un arsenal de observaciones satelitales

    Este estudio está basado en una amplia gama de observaciones satelitales que tienen por objeto caracterizar las variaciones temporales de los parámetros clave del ciclo hidrológico y de la vegetación a escala de ecosistema. Los investigadores han contado con un nuevo conjunto de datos SMOS-IC sobre el índice L-VOD (L-band vegetation optical depth), extraído de las observaciones espaciales del satélite europeo SMOS de la AEE-CNES. Este índice está estrechamente relacionado con el contenido en agua de la vegetación (kg/m2) del conjunto del dosel arbóreo. Más concretamente, junto al L-VOD, indicador del contenido de agua de la vegetación, las otras variables consideradas en el estudio son: el índice de área foliar (leaf area index, LAI), obtenido gracias a observaciones satelitales ópticas y empleado para caracterizar la fenología foliar; las anomalías en el almacenamiento de agua terrestre (TWS, en inglés), calculadas con satélites GRACE; o la humedad del suelo, las precipitaciones y los flujos de transpiración. Las observaciones de la humedad del suelo consideradas aquí se calcularon al mismo tiempo que el índice L-VOD a partir de observaciones multiangulares del satélite SMOS.

    Variaciones estacionales en el bosque tropical seco de Miombo, África (2011-2012) en cuanto al contenido en agua de las plantas (L-VOD), el índice de área foliar (LAI) y las precipitaciones en una región de 1°×1° (centrada en 11.5° S, 18.5° E). Las zonas grises indican la estación seca. © Universidad de Copenhague, F. Tian.

    Cuando se calcula su promedio a escala anual, el índice L-VOD está íntimamente relacionado con la biomasa aérea de la vegetación, una característica que se ha utilizado recientemente para cuantificar los cambios en las reservas de carbono de la vegetación en el continente africano. Más información: http://presse.inra.fr/Communiques-de-presse/un-nouvel-outil-pour-suivre-le-bilan-carbone-de-la-vegetation

     

    Referencia

    Tian, J.-P. Wigneron, P. Ciais, J. Chave, J. Ogée, J. Peñuelas, A. Ræbild, J-C Domec, X. Tong, M. Brandt, A. Mialon, N. Rodriguez-Fernandez, T. Tagesson, A. Al-Yaari, Y. Kerr, C. Chen, R. B. Myneni, W. Zhang, J. Ardö, R. Fensholt, Coupling of ecosystem-scale plant water storage and leaf phenology observed by satellite, Nature Ecology & Evolution, 13 août 2018 – https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-018-0630-3

    Satellite observations reveal secrets of dry tropical forest greening

    Canopy_forest_July2018
    Water stored in plant tissues is fundamental to the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems by participating in plant metabolism, nutrient and carbohydrates transport, and maintenance of the plant hydraulic system’s integrity. Photo by: Pixabay

     

    In dry tropical forests, vegetation takes up water at the end of the wet season and stores it during the driest season of the year. This large amount of stored water enables trees to flush new leaves about one month before the next rainy season. This surprising phenomenon has been revealed for the first time using satellite observations, mainly in the African region of Miombo (around four times the surface area of France), in a study publicated in Nature Ecology and Evolution, will help researchers improve current Earth system models (which do not fully account for plant hydraulic mechanisms) and future climate change and water cycle projections in these regions of the world.

    What are the relationships between plant water storage and leaf development? Are both variables closely related in time and space across the Earth’s surface?  These are critical questions to improve vegetation-atmosphere feedback in Earth system models and predict ecosystem responses to climate change.

    A discovery in the African tropical forest of Miombo

    Using satellite observations, the study conducted by the University of Copenhagen and INRA, in collaboration with the CSIC-CREAF, CEA, CNRS, CNES and Bordeaux Science Agro, demonstrated that seasonal variations in plant water storage and leaf development are highly synchronous in boreal and temperate regions. However, more surprisingly, the researchers showed that these variations are highly asynchronous in dry tropical forests, where an increase in plant water storage precedes vegetation greening by 25 to 180 days. The study focused on the Miombo woodlands, which cover an immense surface area of more than 2.7 million square kilometres to the south of the African rainforests. Satellite observations of this region clearly show that the leaf area index (LAI) begins to increase several weeks before the rainy season begins, a clear sign of “pre-rain” green up that has already been documented in numerous studies. “The mechanisms behind this phenomenon are not yet fully understood but likely involve large construction costs to the plants, which must invest in their rooting system to access deep ground water and in their woody stems to increase their water storage capacity”, said Dr. Feng Tian from Lund University, Sweden.

    The novelty comes from observations of the L-band vegetation optical depth (L-VOD) index (a crucial indicator of the plant water content dynamic) from the European Space Agency (ESA)-CNES SMOS satellite that show that vegetation in Miombo takes up water at the end of the rainy season (when transpiration losses fall) and stores it in woody tissues during most of the dry season until the emergence of new leaves a few weeks before rain starts. “This early leaf flushing has physiological and ecological advantages, reducing the time lag between the onset of the rainy season and that of photosynthetic activity”, said Prof. Rasmus Frensholt from University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

    This intriguing hydraulic behaviour had previously been seen in in situ experiments of a few trees in dry tropical forests, particularly in Costa Rica. However, this new study is the first demonstrating that this is a large-scale phenomenon, visible over forested areas as large as the Miombo woodlands, as well as in the northern African woodlands and the Brazilian Cerrado.

    Moreover, these physiological and hydrological processes are still not included in Earth system models. “Our results offer insights into ecosystem-scale plant water relations globally and provide a basis for an improved parameterization of eco-hydrological and Earth system models. The new L-VOD data set will be key for improving the next generation of Earth system models, leading to more robust projections of the future climate and water cycle in these regions of the world”, said Prof. Josep Peñuelas from CREAF-CSIC.

    Tian_Nat Ecol Evol_2018
    Temporal coupling between L-VOD and LAI seasonality: lag time for L-VOD to obtain the highest correlation with LAI for pixels with a clear seasonality. The black rectangle includes the Miombo woodlands. © Université de Copenhague, F. Tian

    A large set of satellite observations

    This study was based on a large set of satellite observations that aim to characterise the time variations in key hydrological and vegetation parameters at the ecosystem scale. The research benefited from the new SMOS-IC data set of the vegetation index referred to as L-band vegetation optical depth, or L-VOD, retrieved from space-borne observations of the ESA-CNES SMOS satellite. This index is closely related to the vegetation water content (VWC, kg/m2) of the whole canopy layer. More specifically, along with the L-VOD (a proxy of vegetation water storage), the other variables considered in the study include leaf area index (LAI) retrieved from optical satellite observations and used to parameterise foliar phenology, terrestrial groundwater storage anomalies (TWS) retrieved from GRACE satellites, surface soil moisture, rainfall and transpiration. Surface soil moisture observations considered here were retrieved simultaneously with L-VOD from the multi-angular SMOS observations.

    Seasonal water balance in the African tropical Miombo woodlands. The time series (2011-2012) of plant water storage (L-VOD), leaf area index and rainfall for a 1°×1° area (centred at 11.5°S, 18.5°E). The grey shaded rectangles indicate the dry seasons. © Université de Copenhague, F. Tian

    When averaged at a yearly scale, the L-VOD index has been found to be closely related to global patterns of plant aboveground biomass, a feature that was used recently to quantify annual changes in sub-Saharan aboveground biomass carbon stock.For more information: http://presse.inra.fr/en/Press-releases/a-new-tool-to-monitor-the-carbon-budget-of-vegetation

    Reference

    Tian, J.-P. Wigneron, P. Ciais, J. Chave, J. Ogée, J. Peñuelas, A. Ræbild, J-C Domec, X. Tong, M. Brandt, A. Mialon, N. Rodriguez-Fernandez, T. Tagesson, A. Al-Yaari, Y. Kerr, C. Chen, R. B. Myneni, W. Zhang, J. Ardö, R. Fensholt, Coupling of ecosystem-scale plant water storage and leaf phenology observed by satellite, Nature Ecology & Evolution, 13 août 2018 – https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-018-0630-3

    Josep Peñuelas has been awarded with the Marsh Award for Climate Change Research (British Ecological Society)

    The British Ecological Society (BES) announced the winners of its annual awards and prizes, recognising eight distinguished ecologists whose work has benefited the scientific community and society in general.

    Among the winners are Professor Josep Peñuelas from the National Research Council of Spain (CSIC), whose research on the biological impacts of climate change has led to the discovery of ecophysiological mechanisms linked to carbon and oxygen use that help to explain plant species distribution, as well as Dr Ruth Waters, Deputy Chief Scientist at Natural England, who has been praised for working alongside researchers, policymakers and the wider public to promote an ecosystem approach within UK conservation.

     

    For morre information:British Ecological Society

    Josep Peñuelas rep un premi de la Societat d’Ecologia Britànica

    L’ecòleg ha estat guardonat amb el premi Marsh de Recerca en Canvi Climàtic. La cerimònia d’entrega tindrà lloc a Birmingham el proper desembre.

    Peñuelas premi Margalef

    L’investigador del CSIC al CREAF Josep Peñuelas ha estat premiat amb el Marsh Award for Climate Change Research, un guardó atorgat per la British Ecological Society (BES). La institució britànica reconeix així l’excel·lència en la recerca de l’ecòleg en aquest camp. Peñuelas agafa el relleu de Richard Pearson, que el va guanyar el 2017.

    El comitè ha valorat aspectes com la contribució de la recerca a la comprensió sobre com el canvi climàtic influeix en els sistemes i processos ecològics; un registre ampli i excel·lent de publicacions relacionades amb el canvi climàtic i l’ecologia; la participació en conferències internacionals; i haver format part de comitès i consells consultius relacionats amb el canvi climàtic.

    L’acte d’entrega del guardó es farà durant la trobada anual de la BES, el proper 16 – 19 de desembre a la ciutat anglesa de Birmingham.

    Species selection under long-term experimental warming and drought explained by climatic distributions

     

    Garraf_aèria cccc Garraf_coberta

    Field work sites in a Mediterranean shrubland at Garraf, Catalonia (Spain). Photo by: GEU

     

    Global warming and reduced precipitation may trigger large-scale species losses and vegetation shifts in ecosystems around the world. However, the combined effects of temperature and precipitation are highly context-dependent. For example, both warming and decreased precipitation may increase the aridity of an already dry and warm habitat, thereby limiting plant growth. But, in cooler habitats not limited by water, warming may have positive effects on the vegetation (e.g. extending the growing season and promoting growth and reproduction) and decreasing precipitation may have little effect on plant growth.

    In a new study in the journal New Phytologist authors conducted long-term (16 yr) nocturnal-warming (+0.6°C) and reduced precipitation (-20% soil moisture) experiments in a Mediterranean shrubland. Authors classified the species in the community into climatic niche groups (CNGs) using temperature and precipitation variables in order to determine community compositional change with respect to the different treatments.

    “By applying a CNG approach to manipulation experiments, we provide valuable evidence that climatic niche distributions may be able to identify which species may be most vulnerable to shifts in these climate change factors either independently or in conjunction”, said Daijun Liu from CREAF-CSIC Barcelona.

    This study indicates that the decline in the abundance of some climate sensitive species may be balanced by an increase in resistant species distributed in warmer or drier niches. “This was seen in our study with the delayed increase in species associated with dry climates in our drought treatment (e.g. Globularia alypum). Indeed, growing observational and experimental evidence suggests that communities are shifting towards a higher proportion of species associated with warmer climates in response to global warming”, said Prof. Josep Peñuelas from CREAF-CSIC Barcelona

    “Therefore, evidence provided here from the CNG approach suggests that it may be possible to depict, on a global scale, how the magnitude of changes to either temperature and/or precipitation may affect those climate-sensitive species”, added Daijun Liu from CREAF-CSIC Barcelona.

    The study findings indicate that when climatic distributions are combined with experiments, the resulting incorporation of local plant evolutionary strategies and their changing dynamics over time leads to predictable and informative shifts in community structure under independent climate change scenarios.

    “We thus advocate the combined use of both manipulation experiments and the climatic niche principle to improve assessments of community responses to future climate change scenarios”, said Prof. Josep Peñuelas from CREAF-CSIC Barcelona.

     

    Reference: Liu, D., Peñuelas, J., Ogaya, R., Estiarte, M., Tielbörger, K., Slowik, F., Yang, X., Bilton, M.C. 2018. Species selection under long-term experimental warming and drought explained by climatic distributions. New Phytologist (2018) 217: 1494–1506, doi: 10.1111/nph.1492.

    Quantifying soil moisture impacts on light use efficiency across Biomes

    Agricultural droght_Pixabay_June2018
    Water availability is an important factor in limiting ecosystem productivity across much of the Earth’s surface. In the present study, authors investigate “droughts” providing an impact-oriented quantification of them. Photo by: Pixabay

     

     

    Limiting water availability is a recurrent phenomenon and governs plant growth and phenology in arid, semi-arid and Mediterranean ecosystems. Moreover, in temperate, boreal and tropical ecosystems, sporadic prolonged dry periods can lead to water-limited conditions and can have far-reaching impacts on ecosystem carbon balance and structure.

    In a new study in the journal New Phytologist authors investigate “agricultural droughts” characterized for having impacts on vegetation production, including seasonally recurring dry conditions.

    Terrestrial primary production and carbon cycle impacts of droughts are commonly quantified using vapour pressure deficit data and remotely sensed greenness. However, soil moisture limitation is known to strongly affect plant physiology.

    In this study, authors investigate light use efficiency, which means the ratio of gross primary production to absorbed light. Authors derive its fractional reduction due to soil moisture (fLUE), separated from vapour pressure deficit and greenness changes, using artificial neural networks trained on eddy covariance data, multiple soil moisture datasets and remotely sensed greenness.

    “This analysis reveals substantial impacts of soil moisture alone that reduce gross primary production by up to 40% at sites located in sub-humid, semi-arid or arid regions. For sites in relatively moist climates, authors find, paradoxically, a muted fLUE response to drying soil, but reduced fLUE under wet conditions.

    “We show that accounting for soil moisture effects, in addition to vapour pressure deficit, is critical for the estimation of vegetation production across the globe and to quantify drought impacts”, said Dr. Benjamin Dr. Stocker from CREAF-CSIC Barcelona.

    fLUE identifies substantial drought impacts that are not captured when relying solely on vapour pressure deficit and greenness changes and, when seasonally recurring, are missed by traditional, anomaly-based drought indices. Counter to common assumptions, fLUE reductions are largest in drought-deciduous vegetation, including grasslands.

    “Our results indicate that local hydrological conditions are important for understanding drought impacts on vegetation production, highlighting the necessity to account for soil moisture limitation in terrestrial primary production data products, especially for drought-related assessments”, said Prof. Josep Peñuelas from CREAF-CSIC Barcelona.

    Reference: Stocker, B.D., Zscheischler, J., Keenan, T.F., Prentice, I.C., Peñuelas, J., Seneviratne, S.I. 2018. Quantifying soil moisture impacts on light use efficiency across biomes. New Phytologist (2018) 218: 1430–1449. doi: 10.1111/nph.15123. doi: 10.1111/nph.15123

  •  
    • Taller species are taking over in a warming Arctic
      true
      Until now, the Arctic tundra has been the domain of low-growing grasses and dwarf shrubs. But new, taller plant species have been slowly taking over this chilly neighborhood, report an international group with the participation of researchers from CSIC-CREAF. Tundra àrtica The study, initiated by a team of researchers supported through the... Read more »
    • Josep Peñuelas wins a British Ecological Society award
      true
      The ecologist will receive the 2018 Marsh Award for Climate Change Research at a prizegiving ceremony in Birmingham in December. The CREAF-based CSIC researcher Josep Peñuelas has won the Marsh Award for Climate Change Research, which the British Ecological Society issues each year for an outstanding contribution to the field in... Read more »
    • “A temperature rise of 2ºC could have irreversible effects on the planet”
      true
      We interviewed Sara Marañón, a postdoctoral researcher at CREAF with a Marie Curie grant.  Sara Marañón‘s career, which mainly revolves around soil microbial ecology, has taken her across most of Europe. She secured a return to Spain a year ago and now works at CREAF, thanks to a Marie Curie grant,... Read more »
    • Josep Penuelas visited China as grantee of the Distinguished Fellow of the Chinese Academy of Science
      true
      Josep Penuelas visited China the first two weeks of May 2018 as grantee of the Distinguished Fellow of the Chinese Academy of Science. Josep Peñuelas During his stay Prof. Penuelas gave talks and conducted seminars in various centres: Institute of Urban Environment (CAS) in Xiamen, Nanjing Institute of Soil Sciences, Jiaxing Institute... Read more »
    • Plants are exposed to frost more frequently as a result of climate change
      true
      Plants’ annual growing season has lengthened, exposing them to frost more often at a time when they are particularly sensitive. That can be detrimental to their activity and lead to substantial crop yield losses. Winter frost on a mosaic of fields. By Carles Batlles It is not unusual to hear about frost... Read more »
    • Thirsty holm oaks lose 21% more carbon through their roots
      true
      Once rehydrated, holm oaks have a large capacity for recovery thanks to their high adaptation to the Mediterranean climate. The release of organic compounds into the soil represents a considerable loss of carbon for the holm oak and also modifies the microbial community, which may lead to additional effects on... Read more »
    • Men from wealthy countries are getting taller because their diet is rich in nitrogen and phosphorus
      true
      Mean male height in countries with a high level of GDP is 23 cm greater than in countries with a low level, a difference that has risen by 1.5 cm over the last 30 years. Thanks to a more varied diet rich in animal products, the annual nitrogen and phosphorus... Read more »
    • For the time being, forests are helping to slow CO2 accumulation and climate change
      true
      A study led by CREAF shows that decreases in pollutant deposition and the increase in atmospheric CO2 have stimulated photosynthesis and carbon sequestration in forests. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how carbon circulates in the atmosphere, in living organisms, oceans, and soils in order to anticipate the effects of climate... Read more »
    • Rising temperatures threaten global agricultural production
      true
      The production of essential crops such as wheat, maize, rice, and soybean will be substantially reduced. Effective measures for climate change adaptation will be necessary, as well as  improvements in crop genetics in order to reduce the impacts of climate change.  Wheat crop. Source: Pixabay (CC0) Global temperature increase will cause production... Read more »
    • The greening of the earth is reaching its limit
      true
      A new study led by Josep Peñuelas and published in Nature Ecology and Evolution reveals that CO2 abundance in the atmosphere no longer has a powerful fertilizing effect on vegetation. The greening that has been observed in recent years is slowing and this will cause CO2 levels in the atmosphere... Read more »
  •  
    • Gestionar los bosques europeos no va a frenar el calentamiento global
      true
      Aude Valade, investigadora del CREAF y el equipo internacional del estudio publicado en Nature recomiendan hacer una gestión forestal orientada a mantener los servicios ambientales que nos aportan a nivel ecológico, social y cultural, y no a enfriar el planeta, como se preveía hacer para cumplir con el Acuerdo de... Read more »
    • Plantas cada vez más altas están tomando el control de las regiones árticas
      true
      Hasta ahora, la tundra ártica ha sido el dominio de pastos de bajo crecimiento y arbustos enanos. Ahora un estudio internacional publicado en Nature en el que participa el CREAF y el Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) ha descubierto que nuevas especies de plantas más altas están apoderando de... Read more »
    • Josep Peñuelas recibe un premio de la Sociedad de Ecología Británica
      true
      El ecólogo ha sido galardonado con el premio Marsh de Investigación en Cambio Climático. La ceremonia de entrega tendrá lugar en Birmingham el próximo diciembre. El investigador del CSIC en el CREAF Josep Peñuelas ha sido premiado con el Marsh Award for Climate Change Research, un galardón otorgado por la British... Read more »
    • “Un aumento de la temperatura superior a 2 ºC puede desencadenar efectos irreversibles en el planeta”
      true
      Entrevistamos a Sara Marañón, investigadora posdoctoral del CREAF con una beca Marie Curie.  Sara Marañón se ha movido casi por toda Europa para desarrollar su carrera, centrada sobre todo en la ecología microbiana del suelo. Hace un año consiguió volver y ahora trabaja en el CREAF gracias a la beca Marie... Read more »
    • TV3 explica cómo ayudan los bosques a la salud de las personas
      El Telenotícies del 21 de julio explicó en qué consiste el proyecto Boscos Sans per a una Societat Saludable. Una treintena de personas voluntarias paseó por el Montseny para testar los efectos de los compuestos que liberan las plantas.  El Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA-UAB) y el CREAF coordinan conjuntamente... Read more »
    • Josep Peñuelas, miembro distinguido de la Academia China de la Ciencia
      true
      Durante dos semanas del mes de mayo, el investigador del CSIC en el CREAF Josep Peñuelas visitó el país asiático. Peñuelas colabora habitualmente con personal investigador de diferentes instituciones de investigación chinas. Josep Peñuelas visitó en mayo China con motivo del reconocimiento como miembro distinguido de la Academia China de la Ciencia.... Read more »
    • Marcos Fernández Martínez recibe uno de los galardones científicos de los Premios Sant Jordi
      true
      El colaborador del CREAF recibió uno de los premios del LXXXVII Cartel de premios y de bolsas de estudio, el correspondiente al Premio IEC de Ecología RAMON MARGALEF. Fotografía con todas las personas premiadas. Autor: Jordi Pareto / IEC El pasado 20 de abril, el Institut d’Estudis Catalans (IEC) entregó los Premios... Read more »
    • ¿Por qué eran tan grandes los mamuts y otros mega-herbívoros?
      true
      Josep Peñuelas publica un Nature Ecology and Evolution que concluye que el tamaño de estos animales fue la clave para su supervivencia en un entorno frío, seco y extremadamente poco productivo. Los datos se han obtenido gracias a unos modelos matemáticos innovadores que ahora son capaces de predecir la evolución... Read more »
    • Mosquito Alert recibe el galardón Premi Ciutat de Barcelona 2017
      true
      Tres miembros del equipo, John Palmer, Aitana Oltra y Frederic Bartumeus, fueron premiados en la modalidad de de trabajos sobre Ciencias de la Tierra y Ambientales. Por otra parte, Josep Peñuelas recibió una mención especial para esta misma categoría. Roger Eritja, Anna Ramon, John Palmer, Frederic Bartumeus, Aitana Oltra i Marina... Read more »
    • Las plantas están más expuestas a las heladas por culpa del cambio climático
      true
      El período de crecimiento de las plantas durante el año se ha alargado y eso las expone más a las heladas en esta etapa sensible para ellas. Esto puede perjudicar su actividad y provocar pérdidas importantes en los cultivos. Un mosaico de paisajes bajo la escarcha invernal. Autor: Carles Batlles No es... Read more »
  •  
    • Gestionar els boscos europeus no frenarà l’escalfament global
      true
       Aude Valade, investigadora del CREAF, i l’equip internacional de l’estudi publicat a Nature recomanen fer una gestió forestal orientada a mantenir els serveis ambientals que ens aporten els boscos a nivell ecològic, social i cultural, i no a refredar el planeta, com es preveia fer per complir amb l’Acord de... Read more »
    • Plantes cada cop més altes estan prenent el control de les regions àrtiques
      true
      Fins ara, la tundra àrtica ha estat el domini de pastures de baix creixement i arbustos nans.  Ara un estudi internacional publicat a Nature en què participa el CREAF i el Consell Superior d’Investigacions Científiques (CSIC) ha descobert que noves espècies de plantes més altes s’estan apoderant d’aquesta regió lentament. Tundra... Read more »
    • Josep Peñuelas rep un premi de la Societat d’Ecologia Britànica
      true
      L’ecòleg ha estat guardonat amb el premi Marsh de Recerca en Canvi Climàtic. La cerimònia d’entrega tindrà lloc a Birmingham el proper desembre. L’investigador del CSIC al CREAF Josep Peñuelas ha estat premiat amb el Marsh Award for Climate Change Research, un guardó atorgat per la British Ecological Society (BES). La institució... Read more »
    • “Un augment de la temperatura superior a 2 ºC pot desencadenar efectes irreversibles al planeta”
      true
      Entrevistem la Sara Marañón, investigadora postdoctoral del CREAF amb una beca Marie Curie.  Sara Marañón s’ha mogut gairebé per tot Europa per desenvolupar la seva carrera, centrada sobretot en l’ecologia microbiana del sòl. Fa un any va aconseguir tornar i ara treballa al CREAF gràcies a la beca Marie Curie, tot... Read more »
    • Josep Peñuelas, membre distingit de l’Acadèmia Xinesa de la Ciència
      true
      Durant dues setmanes del mes de maig, l’investigador del CSIC al CREAF Josep Peñuelas va visitar el país asiàtic. Peñuelas col·labora habitualment amb personal investigador de diferents institucions de recerca xineses. Josep Peñuelas va visitar el maig passat la Xina en motiu del reconeixement com a membre distingit de l’Acadèmia Xinesa... Read more »
    • En Marcos Fernández Martínez rep un dels guardons científics dels Premis Sant Jordi
      true
      El col·laborador del CREAF va rebre un dels premis del LXXXVII Cartell de premis i de borses d’estudi, el corresponent al Premi IEC d’Ecologia RAMON MARGALEF. Fotografia amb totes les persones premiades. Autor: Jordi Pareto / IEC El passat 20 d’abril, l’Institut d’Estudis Catalans (IEC) va lliurar els Premis Sant Jordi 2018 corresponents al LXXXVII... Read more »
    • L’aforestació neutraliza el pH dels sòls
      true
      L’aforestació és un tipus de canvi en els usos del sòl destinat a la producció de fusta, la conservació d’aigua i sòl, incrementar l’emmagatzematge de carboni i la mitigació del canvi climàtic. Aquest estudi mostra com la reforestació canvia a més una variable clau del sòl, el seu pH. Font: Pixabay... Read more »
    • Per què eren tan grans els mamuts i altres megaherbívors?
      true
      Josep Peñuelas publica un Nature Ecology and Evolution que conclou que la mida d’aquests animals va ser la clau per la seva supervivència en un entorn fred, sec i extremadament poc productiu. Les dades s’han obtingut gràcies a uns models matemàtics innovadors que ara són capaços de predir l’evolució del paisatge... Read more »
    • Mosquito Alert rep el guardó Premi Ciutat de Barcelona 2017
      true
      Tres membres de l’equip, John Palmer, Aitana Oltra i Frederic Bartumeus, van ser premiats en la modalitat de de treballs sobre Ciències de la Terra i Ambientals. Per altra banda, Josep Peñuelas va rebre una menció especial per a aquesta mateixa categoria. Roger Eritja, Anna Ramon, John Palmer, Frederic Bartumeus, Aitana Oltra... Read more »
    • Les plantes estan més exposades a les glaçades per culpa del canvi climàtic
      true
      El període de creixement de les plantes durant l’any s’ha allargat i això les exposa més a les gelades en aquesta etapa sensible per a elles. Això pot perjudicar la seva activitat i provocar pèrdues importants en conreus. Un mosaic de paisatges sota el gebre de l’hivern. Autor: Carles Batlles No és... Read more »